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Randy Galloway – Farewell to a Legend

And the airwaves in North Texas got a little more silent.

No longer will we hear the bombastic Texas twang of one who helped pioneer sports talk in the Chicken Fried Nation with his wimp-free attitude.

Randy Galloway stepped away from the microphone for the last time Monday evening, ending a 28-year radio career at WBAP and ESPN 103.3.

An era is over. No longer will we get to hear criticism of everyone in town who thinks they’re “Football Einsteins.” No more ridicule of the Botox and Implant crowds at either the Boss Hogg Bowl or the ADD. We sadly didn’t even get to hear one more time about how the fans of Zero-U must stop at the dip station to clean up before they arrive to cheer against the Whiny Orange at the Cotton Bowl.

Amazing that when Galloway started on the DFW airwaves, the Rangers were still in Arlington Stadium and had yet to draw two million in attendance. Tom Landry was still patrolling the sidelines and the Cows had a real general manager. The Stars were in Minnesota, the Mavericks wore green and the Southwest Conference was still in existence. Randy Galloway truly has seen it all.

But it appears that Galloway will be leaving the airwaves without the complete respect that he deserves. Oh, no doubt the likes of Chuck Cooperstein, Mac and Jennifer Engel, Matt Moseley, Brian Estridge and many others that got to work with Randy will give him his due.

But sadly, many others – mainly, those most die-hard “P1” supporters of Galloway’s number one competition for years, the hosts of Sportsradio 1310 The Ticket – will blow their party favors and say “good riddance to Grandpa Urine,” even if those hosts on their beloved station secretly do harbor respect for the man while refusing to say so on the air.

That more than anything has helped contribute to my own hesitation toward becoming a full-time listener to The Ticket – the arrogance of certain listeners and the lack of respect they have for the elder statesmen. There might not be a Ticket if not for people like Galloway (and Norm Hitzges, who supposedly gets ridicule from people associated with The Ticket also even though he works for them). Of course, there are other reasons Galloway gets such disdain, likely due to him having the coconuts to say what many don’t want to hear.

It almost certainly is partly to do with Galloway not being afraid to admit what the Dallas Cowboys have become in the last 18 years – a complete joke of a franchise that may never have a chance of reaching the mountaintop ever again. Galloway and Dale Hansen have been the only two still around in North Texas willing to constantly say that, as long as Jerry Jones is running things, the Cows will always be a mess with no real hope of reaching the Super Bowl again. And that’s just not something the millions wearing the rose-colored glasses for their team – the “Cow Sheep,” as he loved to call them – want to hear.

But that is just the type of attitude that made Galloway a legend in this town before the likes of Ben and Skin were even first trying to coddle up to pro athletes. Galloway has never shied away from the unpopular opinion. Never been afraid to call out anyone, be it Tom Hicks or the Jon Daniels that everyone else worships.

How? How could he possibly side with the old world-has-passed-him-by Nolan Ryan over the infallible genius that single-handedly built the Rangers to the World Series? Because he remembers that the Rangers were nothing before Nolan saddled up into town for the first time in 1989? And that maybe it’s easier to find a general manager immersed in those newfangled sabermetrics to pick talent than someone that can convince said talent that pitching in the “blast furnace” of the Ballpark should not be a hindrance?

Yes, there were definitely people who did not like Galloway because he would not follow the crowd. But for someone who could never be a part of that crowd either, it was what earned him my respect.

It’s because of Galloway that I know to not rely too much on stats and “watch the damn games.” And while I still curse at what 105.3 The Fan did to Richie Whitt, Jasmine Sadry and others recently, I am glad to see a legend got to walk away on his terms.

Galloway will continue to spout his opinions in written form, still contributing his columns in the Star-Telegram. I’ll expect to hear people whine about his opinions, yet they will still read them. Just know he had hot sports opinions before “HSOs” were cool.

For now, Happy Trails, Randy Galloway. Tom Hicks was wrong; few had more credibility than you.

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